Welcome to the English Department

  • CHS English Course Descriptions 2017-18

    ENGLISH I CP

    GRADE: 9 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Freshman standing

    Students in CP English I work on the skills they need in both high school and college.  They develop their writing skills by studying and practicing the writing of sentences and paragraphs, an autobiographical narrative,  and an essay. They develop their close reading and analytical skills through the examination of works of fiction and nonfiction, including a novel length text, short stories, and various articles and informational texts.  Students develop speaking skills and increase their academic vocabulary through structured small and large group discussions, as well as group and individual presentations.  

    ENGLISH I AS

    GRADE: 9 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Recommendation of eighth grade teacher and/or counselor

    Freshman English AS focuses on the close analysis of literature and various types of nonfiction texts.  Students are exposed to literary genres such as novels and short stories, and through the examination of these texts they become familiar with a variety of literary devices, focusing most heavily on figurative language, diction, elements of plot, and characterization. Students are asked to write extensively, in the form of paragraphs and essays, as well as an autobiographical narrative.  Students develop speaking skills and increase their academic vocabulary through structured small and large group discussions, as well as group and individual presentations.

    ENGLISH II CP

    GRADE: 10 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing

    This college preparatory course is designed to develop and strengthen reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills.  These skills will be developed through a detailed study of and response to a variety of fiction and nonfiction text, many of which will align with the content of 10th grade Modern World History.  One area of focus will be developing and practicing research skills.  

    ENGLISH II AS

    GRADE: 10 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of English I AS or recommendation of teacher

    This college preparatory course is designed to develop and strengthen reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills needed for success in IB English.  These skills will be developed through a detailed study of and response to a variety of fiction and nonfiction text, many of which will align with the content of 10th grade Modern World History.  One area of focus will be developing and practicing research skills.  

    ENGLISH III CP

    GRADE: 11 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Junior standing

    In English III, students will continue to develop skills centered around academic language and literacy to help them be able to communicate their ideas effectively in preparation for college and career. This will include an emphasis on analyzing texts (speeches, poems, plays, novels, mixed media, etc.) from a variety of American authors, preparing oral presentations, developing compelling arguments, and deconstructing the many elements of both fiction and nonfiction texts. 

    IB ENGLISH HL I

    GRADE: 12 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of English II AS or recommendation of teacher

    This is the first year of a two year sequence. Assessments include a presentation, an oral commentary, essays, and creative written tasks. The first semester focuses on the study of language and media using a variety of texts, including academic works, 1984, and news sources. Some of the topics covered are race in the media, censorship, and language and the state. The second semester features a heavy emphasis on close reading and discussion of three texts: Twelfth Night, Beloved, and The Things They Carried. This portion of the course engages students in critical reading, writing, and thinking about how authors use literary techniques to achieve their purpose. 

    English IV (ERWC)

    GRADE: 12 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: Senior standing

    The Expository Reading and Writing course (ERWC) prepares college-bound seniors for the literacy demands of higher education. Through a sequence of eight to ten rigorous instructional units, students in this yearlong, rhetoric-based course develop advanced proficiency in expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. Teachers of this course present a scaffolded process for helping students read, comprehend, and respond to nonfiction and literary texts. Units also provide instruction in research methods and documentation conventions. Students will be expected to increase their awareness of the rhetorical strategies employed by authors and to apply those strategies to their own writing. They will read closely to examine the relationship between an author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and purpose; to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies; and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. By the end of the course, students will be expected to use this process independently when reading unfamiliar texts and writing in response to them. The ERWC is closely aligned to the seven criteria of the UC English requirements. Students successfully completing this course develop skills, knowledge, processes, and dispositions in speaking rhetorically, and habits of mind.

    IB ENGLISH HL II

    GRADE: 12 / CREDITS: 5 / COLLEGE RECOMMENDED? YES

    PREREQUISITES: IB English I

    This is the second year of a two year sequence. Year 2 of the IB Language and Literature program aims to explore how language develops in specific cultural contexts, how it impacts the world, and how language shapes both individual and group identity. Students are expected to demonstrate an awareness of how language and meaning inform, and are informed by, culture and context. The course will align these learning outcomes with a vast array of thematically connected texts.  Second semester, we will continue to explore the complex intersections of social class, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity and its relationship to power. These concepts will be explored further within Sartre’s No Exit, Kincaid’s A Small Place, and Hesse’s Siddhartha, in addition to an application of psychoanalytical and philosophical frameworks. Students will be expected to challenge, question, formulate, and develop ideas about different texts, their meaning, purpose and implications about society and its members’ identity.